WHAT IS HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Human trafficking involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act. Every year, millions of men, women, and children are trafficked worldwide – including right here in the United States. It can happen in any community and victims can be any age, race, gender, or nationality. Traffickers might use violence, manipulation, or false promises of well-paying jobs or romantic relationships to lure victims into trafficking situations.

Recognizing key indicators of human trafficking is the first step in identifying victims and can help save a life. Here are some common indicators to help recognize human trafficking. You can also download or order the Blue Campaign indicator card, which is a small plastic card that lists common signs of trafficking and how to report the crime.

  • Does the person appear disconnected from family, friends, community organizations, or houses of worship?
  • Has a child stopped attending school?
  • Has the person had a sudden or dramatic change in behavior?
  • Is a juvenile engaged in commercial sex acts?
  • Is the person disoriented or confused, or showing signs of mental or physical abuse?
  • Does the person have bruises in various stages of healing?
  • Is the person fearful, timid, or submissive?
  • Does the person show signs of having been denied food, water, sleep, or medical care?
  • Is the person often in the company of someone to whom he or she defers? Or someone who seems to be in control of the situation, e.g., where they go or who they talk to?
  • Does the person appear to be coached on what to say?
  • Is the person living in unsuitable conditions?
  • Does the person lack personal possessions and appear not to have a stable living situation?
  • Does the person have freedom of movement? Can the person freely leave where they live? Are there unreasonable security measures?

Predators and human traffickers can gain access to victims online because people are not always aware of how dangerous online environments can be or how to keep themselves safe. While the Internet is a great way to stay in touch with friends and family, predators oftentimes take advantage of this and actively stalk online meeting places such as chat rooms and social media sites to lure their victims.

Below are several safety tips to keep in mind while surfing the web and using social media:

  • Never share pictures of yourself online that you wouldn’t want to be seen by your family, teachers, or a total stranger.
  • Set user profile to private so only real friends can get access. Know who you’re chatting with – a “friend” is not always a friend.
  • Treat people online as you would in person: be polite!
  • Don’t share personal information online such as your full name, school, address or phone number, or user passwords.
  • Don’t meet up in person with anyone you met online.
  • Report suspected abuse to law enforcement or a trusted adult.

Project iGuardian is an initiative by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations focused on keeping children and teens safe from online predators through education and awareness. For more resources such as additional safety tips and how to report suspected cybercrimes, visit https://www.ice.gov/topics/iGuardians.

Here are some common myths and misconceptions about human trafficking:

Myth: Human trafficking does not occur in the United States. It only happens in other countries.

Fact: Human trafficking exists in every country, including the United States. It exists nationwide—in cities, suburbs, and rural towns—and possibly in your own community.

Myth: Human trafficking victims are only foreign born individuals and those who are poor.

Fact: Human trafficking victims can be any age, race, gender, or nationality. They may come from any socioeconomic group.

Myth: Human trafficking is only sex trafficking.

Fact: Sex trafficking exists, but it is not the only type of human trafficking. Forced labor is another type of human trafficking; both involve exploitation of people. Victims are found in legitimate and illegitimate labor industries, including sweatshops, massage parlors, agriculture, restaurants, hotels, and domestic service.

Myth: Individuals must be forced or coerced into commercial sex acts to be victims of human trafficking.

Fact: Under U.S. federal law, any minor under the age of 18 who is induced to perform commercial sex acts is a victim of human trafficking, regardless of whether he or she is forced or coerced.

Myth: Human trafficking and human smuggling are the same.

Fact: Human trafficking is not the same as smuggling. “Trafficking” is based on exploitation and does not require movement across borders. “Smuggling” is based on movement and involves moving a person across a country’s border with that person’s consent in violation of immigration laws. Although human smuggling is very different from human trafficking, human smuggling can turn into trafficking if the smuggler uses force, fraud, or coercion to hold people against their will for the purposes of labor or sexual exploitation. Under federal law, every minor induced to engage in commercial sex is a victim of human trafficking.

Myth: Human trafficking victims will attempt to seek help when in public.

Fact: Human trafficking is often a hidden crime. Victims may be afraid to come forward and get help; they may be forced or coerced through threats or violence; they may fear retribution from traffickers, including danger to their families; and they may not be in possession of or have control of their identification documents.

Above content is available at the dhs.gov website. For more facts and statistics please visit this website to see how you may help someone who may be involved and how you may be able to help them get to safety.

WHAT WE DO

MISSION

MISSION

Eagle’s Nest Sanctuary is dedicated to transitional independent living for human trafficking survivors.

VALUES

Values

Kindness: Understanding the unique needs of those we serve.
Integrity: Respecting the values of all we touch, Honesty in all we do.
Accountability: Good stewards of our resources entrusted to us by our grantees, donors and patrons.
Hope: Removing obstacles that extinguish Hope.
Ideation: Involving community and our constituents for creation of new ideas and continued improvement.

ABOUT US

ABOUT US

We are a transitional housing model for sexual human trafficking survivors, post care. Our mission is to help women that have aged out of traditional sex trafficking shelters. We offer transitional housing with individual quarters for each survivor in a campus setting to those who have completed initial trauma care and other immediate services. We will coordinate with the efforts of local shelters that work with sex trafficking victims through the age of 18 years, in providing a solid foundation to empower women to realize their self-worth. By time they leave Eagles Nest Sanctuary they are confident, self-reliant and have the Freedom to Soar!

HELP TODAY

Help Today

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SERVICES WE OFFER

CONTACT US

Every bit of help counts towards our goal of helping victims of human trafficking. Reach out to us today if you know of any one who may need assistance in recovering.

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